Who will fund the growth of online teaching in international higher education?

Fee-paying students and their families.
0% (0 votes)
Transnational corporations and their owners.
14% (1 vote)
National governments.
0% (0 votes)
International organisations such as the EU or UNESCO.
57% (4 votes)
The Church and NGOs.
29% (2 votes)
Total votes: 7

Comments

In an ideal world, this account should be divided between the government (in its various instances), in addition to NGOs and occasional investments by the private sector. In the current reality of Brazil, the most feasible scenario would be financing from Transnational corporations and / or, church, regardless of the prelature. The problem is that "there is no free lunch" and any player, even the government, which a priori should make an investment in the intellectual capital of its citizens, will ask for a counterpart, whatever it may be. In a scenario of political and financial insecurities that Brazil is currently experiencing, it is more likely that this account will end up in the hands of students and their families - those who can afford it. Those who do not have the resources are at the mercy of increasingly scarce scholarships or free initiatives. Or count on luck and be a drop in an ocean of competitors on scholarships offered by entities like Unesco, or even the private sector.
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I think this debate can go through achieving effectiveness and efficiency. Although, achieving effectiveness and efficiency in online higher education depends on public authorities creating the right framework, at first place, which higher education institutions can operate. This is characterized by adequate funding and effective quality assurance policies. Whatever the sources of funding, the Church, NGOs, the government, the private sector or the students and their families, I think it is important that the quality and the search for results that can contribute to society must be taken into account. And the search for better results for society through education needs to involve the building of partnerships. So, I think that the institutions that I mentioned earlier, can seek common interests and create the necessary conditions for online international higher education to generate effective results. Of course, this is not an easy task. Never was. But I think the constant search for opportunities is worthwhile. And this pandemic scenario offers an opportunity to reimagine online international higher education and partnerships that span borders. I would like to hear from our colleagues about this. What do you think about it?
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"reimagine online international higher education and partnerships that span borders," love this sentence. I think international online education is a great opportunity. The key, though, is how we fund this education. As Alexandra mentioned, there are particularities in every country that affect the appreciation of where to find the money. Perhaps the combination of several institutions (from different countries), and a percentage paid by the students could be the formula. And as Thel mentions, international cooperation can play an essential role in this regard.
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Watching the videos, reading the possible answers to the question posted, and thinking about yesterday Diego's lecture, all I can think is about cognitive dissonance. I don't know if you are aware of this social psychology concept, but it is one of the most inspiring ones I've ever learned because it explains how do I feel when these kinds of topics emerge. Very succinctly, cognitive dissonance consists of the discomfort experienced when your attitudes, beliefs, and values are confronted with reality; when you have to behave against your thinking. For instance, in this case, I am a passionate defender of public education, but If I want to eat, I need to be paid for what I am teaching. This confrontation creates this unrest in myself, that small inner voice that tells me that what I am doing is not entirely correct. To overcome that discomfort, I have two options: I can change my behavior or change my discourse. Usually, we tend to justify what we do because it is easier to change what we say than changing our doings. So, in this case, related to funding, I think cognitive dissonance plays a role. People would accept a certain level of discomfort, taking money for their teaching purposes as long as they can easily justify themselves. It is going to depend on many factors: ideology, beliefs, values (among others). Who is going to be the future educational sponsor? Well, it depends. It is going to depend on which institution you are working for, how ambitious you are in your professional career, which values you have, etc. All this combined will predict which sponsor you will accept for teaching your online classes. Which lines are you willing to cross for the good of education?
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Thanks Cristina for this compact explanation about Cognitive Dissonance. I didn't know about this concept before, but I completely understand it (for many situations in my life). With regard to online international education, I think that Cristina`s question goes straight to the point "Which lines are you willing to cross for the good of education?". I also think that this question should be addressed en bloc with it "reflected" question: "Which lines are you NOT willing to cross for the good of education?" The idea of making both questions, for me, is to identify, in a course, what might be for sale (advertising time/space, product promotion, sponsored topic) and what is not (content change, false information, among others). By literally setting the limits of what is not for negotiation, we prevent the sponsors to undermine the course`s quality in order to better attend to their interests. It is necessary to be aware of some prospective sponsors, because for some of them "if you a hand, it soon wants the arm" (as we say in Brazil).
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This isn’t a simple question to answer. If we look at the reality of Brazil, where I live, perhaps the initial answer would be “the government”, because the model that used to work relatively well, at least before Covid-19, was based on financing of presential international higher education courses by the federal and state governments. Many Brazilians have obtained their doctoral courses thru exchanges programs abroad. However, being very realistic, considering international online higher education at the present moment in Brazil, it could mean replacing the presencial model with the online one, due to the lower costs of online education, instead of having boths models and respecting the areas that are most dependent on presencial work. Also, there is a risk that the government will not prioritize the quality of the courses, choosing the cheapest options that do not have a commitment to quality. Therefore, the best answer I see for the question is financing by organizations like EU or UNESCO. These organizations have an educational background. In the case of UNESCO, there is a policy aimed at primary education in order to improve/develop communities and social groups in situations of inequality and social risk, as we can see the videos. Also, they are preparing for the MOOCs courses. In the case of the EU, there is already a tradition of offering international master's courses, as shown in the Collegium Civitas video. With such purpose, these organizations are better prepared to fund international online higher education courses, with the goal of making a difference in people's lives and for as many people as possible. Perhaps this is the true meaning of an education that can become democratic. This would be a possible solution for Brazil: having EU and UNESCO partners who can share the cost of the scholarships for Brazilian students. I think that the Brazilian government should be open to new proposals for partnership on international online higher education.
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Education is essentially a service, sometimes a good. So, it is obvious that someone has to pay for it. Who will pay for education will always depend on who gets the benefits from the fact that the learner gets some knowledge. In the case of pre-school education, the greatest benefits have employers and, accordingly, the city authorities, whose budgets get taxes both on the earnings of parents who are employees and on the benefits they create. Therefore, this type of education for children is usually paid for by either municipalities or employers (creating kindergartens at enterprises, organizations, etc.). If we talk about school education, the most interested are always municipalities, and little less the state. After all, these subjects prepare future employees for themselves, respectively, it is important for them that these employees are properly trained. The availability of higher education is assessed differently in different countries. In some of them it is highly valued, and therefore all study for students are paid by the state (on a competitive basis). Other states choose a mixed form of funding: partly it is paid by the state, partly by future employers (in the form of scholarships for those students who will later be employed by them), and partly by the students themselves. Finally, when we talk about international education, it should be very clear who is the closest beneficiary and who ultimately pays for such education. First of all, it should be understood that in any case the most interested are the countries whose residents are students (because, given globalization, it is important for them to have professionals who are specialists and professionals in accordance with international standards), as well as various international unions, for whom the dissemination of knowledge and democratic values ​​among allied states is important. However, international education is usually paid by international organizations. But who is the payer in the end? Formally, these organizations are payers. But it should be understood that the budgets of these organizations are often formed by contributions from member countries. Therefore, in the end, citizens of different countries pay for international education, from whose taxes contributions to such organizations are actually paid by states, and, consequently, the budgets of such organizations are formed.
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