Should gamification be applied more to online teaching and learning?

Yes, because it has proven to increase student engagement at a time in which the latter is in crisis.
90% (9 votes)
No, because if students are rewarded too much at school they will be disappointed with real life afterwards.
0% (0 votes)
No, because students may focus on hacking a game instead of learning.
0% (0 votes)
Yes, because with online technologies we can design smarter games that are difficult to hack.
10% (1 vote)
Total votes: 10

Comments

When a person is interested in something, she or he feels mobilized to learn, so gamification can be a positive learning tool, it remains to be understood how we work this kind of content and concepts with students. A final note - the Pewdiepie Tuber Simulator game is great, I don't usually play games, but this one is very addictive and it's a good way to understand the role of a youtuber. Based on our class today, it wouldn't be a bad idea for us to be a little bit like a youtuber when teaching online. By the way, I understood better how to play the Pewdiepie game by watching some tutorial videos at YouTube.
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Games have always proved to be an enticing way of engaging people in all kinds of activities, educational ones especially. One finds pleasure in discovering the way a game is played and one wins for the first time. After all, gratification through a set of funny steps is the key to acquiring abilities.
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Indeed, Cinthia and Maria has good points about it. And I believe that gamification can bring great opportunities for teachers who also seek to provide the best classroom experience - with learning - with their students. I would like to go further: I do realize that PewDiePie’s game has some good lessons to teach us. I would like to highlight just three of them: 1. He created a consistent brand: He proves that brand image doesn’t have to feel manufactured and predictable. He is natural, organic and authentic. And since students understand their teachers as being authentic, unique and original, I think the engagement between them can increase. 2. He engages his audience: I believe engagement is one of the most effective ways to drive brand, specially the personal brand; but it’s also important to remember that even the smallest interactions with students can be brand identity drivers. And the app (the game itself) does that very well. In a virtual learning environment, engagement with students makes learning more natural, as if we were in person with our students. And, fortunately, there are countless ways to create engagement in a virtual learning environment, like preparing the students for the online experiente, presenting clear and organized learning materials and build a learning community, just to mention a few of them. 3. He grows and evolve: I believe the message itself is the dynamics of a brand’s image; and it should always be evolutionary, not revolutionary. In other words, There is no need to reinvent the wheel; but discover new ways to make a better wheel. The same can apply in the virtual learning environment. As soon as we have access to and knowledge of the different tools, and gamification is an important one, we can deliver a better classroom experience to our students. With all of that, as teachers, I believe we can, at least, try to do the same.
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The 21st century has brought the world many qualitatively new challenges that have changed lives forever. Obviously, if a change has come to us forever, there is no point in ignoring it. This change must be adapted to your daily life, to get the most out of it. The most important changes are total computerization, informatization and, accordingly, gamification. Children, teenagers and adults are accustomed to the daily saturation of life with new information, bright pictures and entertainment that are given by gadgets. Accordingly, the changes affected the educational process. Today there is a real war between the teacher and gadgets for the attention of pupils and students. However, if we cannot defeat a phenomenon, we must conquer it. Therefore, today a logical step is to use of gamification in the educational process. Thus, the learning process becomes more interesting, attractive and one that holds the attention of pupils and students. Gamification allows us to create a sense of combination of theory and practice, as well as teach students basic practical skills. Gamification is most often used in business and social sciences. It is must be mentioned that the feeling of competition between students can replace the traditional assessment of students' knowledge by the teacher, as in the pursuit of victory they will strive to be better, and therefore will pay more attention to the learning process through games.
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I don't use to play games frequentely, but as I have a son with 10 years old, sometimes he invites me to play. And I love the games when we should collaborate with our partner to get the next step into the game. If we can do this on the on-line classes with our students, I think they will learning in different way. It is not easy to innovate on the teaching methodologies, but in on line classes we have a lot of ways to innovation, like to make fun videos, create discussions forums, propose to play games. I think Gamification can be apply to the different approaches and can be insert into a learning platform, for example Kahoot! I don't like the idea to take a risk, but I agree with the guy of the second video: if we don't try to do something different the students will not be motivate to learn and to innovate as well. Then, I'm thinking now that maybe I should take more risk in my methodologies of teaching. ;0)
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Hi! I read and appreciated all the comments posted. I found some of my ideas in every comment posted. Games can be fun, exciting and challenging, depending on what kind of game everyone prefers. The younger generations know the games that are in trend. They are curious and want to quickly test everything that appears. I didn't know about the PewDiePie's Tuber Simulator game but my 10 year old daughter had already played it. Honestly, I don't prefer games that are based on acquisitions of things. I like games with numbers like 2048 or Sudoku. I wasted some time playing such games but it helps me relax from my current activities. Games help to develop competitive ability but at the same time can create addiction based the desire to reach the maximum level. Some may feel frustrated that they cannot exceed a certain level or get a certain score. In online teaching, I have already used the Kahoot platform to create games based on the theoretical notions that students should know. I can say that they told me that they liked it, although in the first phase some did not know what to do, so they played it several times under various ids to get a high score.
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The comments and points of view of my colleagues are very interesting, I would like to make some more points expanding on my initial comment about the game Pewdiepie Tuber Simulator. In the last few days, I dedicated myself to this game and I have already reached level 12, as you can see at https://i.imgur.com/HWI1YKt.png (so that you can be sure that I am being sincere). Getting to this stage in the game was not easy, I invested many hours playing. Now I´m able to choose the style of the youtuber (hair type, ornaments, T-shirt), the objects that should be visible or not in the room, transform the objects bought into pixels, with the idea of a more ecological world, play the “cranic” game more often, which is super simple, but very motivating because it is difficult to get the objects that are worth more. Thinking about the game, these achievements were very motivating for me and helped me to understand how a youtuber works - very dependent on a sponsor, but also someone who needs to be very creative to post the videos and have more views, know how to spend the earnings in the game, etc. I suspect that what motivated me the most was the challenge inherent in this type of game, a competition with myself, on how to best use the game's resources (which expand with each new stage). This competition is not that exacerbated or as aggressive as we often see in the logic of capitalist systems, but it is a competition that is part of the game, that motivates the player to continue in the game. In the same way, I see that we can use gamification in classes with students of higher education in order to encourage them and make them feel challenged to learn the contents of the classes, perhaps using bonuses based on different evaluation parameters that can break with the negative elements of the ranking process or of an exacerbated competition that escapes the objectives of a didactic process.

 

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I was introduced to the concept of Gamefication some years ago during my Master's. It was an app called "HabitRPG" which has the aim to help you to construct some personal habits and, by doing so, to boost productivity. I played for a while and, for me, the game was a little childish and meaningless. Since then, I have some prejudice about the gamification (which is not fair, as I got an opinion about a whole topic by one personal experience). After the material presented, the comments and some other materials I found at Internet, I am trying to put my prejudice away and focusing on how I could use this tool to aid me on one of the most challenging issues I have today: student engagement. This issue is more relevant for base courses (such as Physics), in which the students are mainly freshmen/freshwomen and have no idea how the content approached at the course can be useful in their lives. I imagine that I could approach this issue by transforming the topics of the course into different game phases, with well-defined rules and reward system presented at the beginning of each stage. In order to bring the content near to “shop floor” environment, at each phase, a real-life problem is addressed. This is just a backbone idea that may fit to one of my courses. And you folks, did you already use this tool before? How could it be implemented at different courses?
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I realized now that we are already in a game. By answering questions, watching videos and other things, we get higher scores, we climb to the top. We are learning about the use of games in education, actually playing in a game. Elements that define gamification such as scoring, competition with others, game rules are used to get more involved in the activities on the platform. Very interesting I would say, learning by doing.
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As the first video mention, Gamification is promising but has its difficulties: "We must keep our eyes open." As mentioned in the Ted Talk of the second video, we need to keep up to date, and Gamification is an excellent tool to engage students. It is an opportunity to promote knowledge in a space free of judgment. Following the idea that education should be fun, as in the first years in the kindergarten. In doing so, I agree that we need to change school at the core. We have to recover learning as a way of discovering, less rigid. As Diego mentioned in the last lecture, and videos 3rd and 4th pointed out, Gamification also has its drawbacks. When a measure becomes the target it ceases to be a measure, it can produce the reward hacking, and focusing too much on quantity and not quality. We need to be aware and careful about this. Also, we keep in mind that regularly human beings are quite reluctant to changes. Whereas students are going to be very excited, introducing Gamification in their day by day, I guess that our working institutions will be less enthusiastic. There is a fear of leaving the control zone, and using Gamification in teaching implies a new educational perspective. I am very keen on starting to use Gamification in some aspects of my teaching, but being aware of the Goodhart's law that is fully explained with real-life examples in the 4th video. We need to be very careful in the use of Gamification. Not only with one single measure, but a model that combines several measures and factors to avoid the risk to reward quantity and not quality. Gamification is an opportunity, and as such, using it wisely is a way to improve our teaching and the knowledge gained by our students. It only worries me, using it properly, not to make people less committed because they are not reaching as many rewards as their classmates. This comparison effect is not included in any of the videos, and I think it is also a factor to consider. Gamification implies a particular type of competition. It is essential to focus on an intrinsic competition to yourself, not to your colleagues (as PewDiePie game does). Otherwise, it can create a lousy relation climate among students. I always apply for cooperation and not competition. Competition is useful to a certain degree, but better results are achieved by collaboration in the long term.
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